What is the Big Bang?
One of the questions that we all asked ourselves was “Where did we come from?” Modern Science has a beautiful explanation of the origin of essentially everything and it’s called the Big Bang Theory. If you look up in the night sky and record the motion of the stars you will see that all the stars and galaxies are moving away from the Earth at ever faster speeds. If you run time backwards everything must have come from a single point at some point in time, right? That is the big bang!
                The universe at that time was of infinite size but matter was so condensed it was in a state that is not understood today. For an unknown reason the infinite universe began to expand into itself at an alarming rate. The matter or whatever was in the universe during this misunderstood session was too hot to form atoms and molecules we know of today. Electrons could not bond with protons to produce light so the universe was black.

                Eventually the universe expanded enough to decrease the temperature so electrons could bond to protons. That is when the first light was given off. The universe went from a dark hot mess to a fireball of photons (light) giving us the cosmic microwave background radiation we see today. The circular universe we envision today is nothing more than our observable universe, the boundary that we cannot see because light beyond that point has yet to reach us. As the universe cooled, atoms formed into molecules and came together into galaxies, stars and planets.

What is the Big Bang?

One of the questions that we all asked ourselves was “Where did we come from?” Modern Science has a beautiful explanation of the origin of essentially everything and it’s called the Big Bang Theory. If you look up in the night sky and record the motion of the stars you will see that all the stars and galaxies are moving away from the Earth at ever faster speeds. If you run time backwards everything must have come from a single point at some point in time, right? That is the big bang!

                The universe at that time was of infinite size but matter was so condensed it was in a state that is not understood today. For an unknown reason the infinite universe began to expand into itself at an alarming rate. The matter or whatever was in the universe during this misunderstood session was too hot to form atoms and molecules we know of today. Electrons could not bond with protons to produce light so the universe was black.

                Eventually the universe expanded enough to decrease the temperature so electrons could bond to protons. That is when the first light was given off. The universe went from a dark hot mess to a fireball of photons (light) giving us the cosmic microwave background radiation we see today. The circular universe we envision today is nothing more than our observable universe, the boundary that we cannot see because light beyond that point has yet to reach us. As the universe cooled, atoms formed into molecules and came together into galaxies, stars and planets.